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  • Dual citizenship - USA / UK

    Can someone tell me please, if anyone knows... Do my boys HAVE to have both US and UK passports. (Mother UK - Father US with perm' leave to stay)

    We were told back when I arranged their PP that they HAD to have both, they could leave the UK on a UK PP but to return they would need both.

    Now this peed me off as it isn't cheap and it isn't a joy to get the US PP either... it was a horridy Londony trip!!!!

    Now one of our children (12) has the opportunity to go to France next year but I don't have any PP valid.... do I need to do both again?

  • #2
    Re: Dual citizenship - USA / UK

    Who told you that?

    It is unclear whether you children have their own passports or they are in yours/your spouse's. It is also unclear where they were born. If born in UK with a UK parent they are entitled to a UK passport in their own right from babies. Is is also unclear whether you are in your spouse's passport, or you have also a US passport with permission to reside in US perhaps, assuming dual US/UK citizenship?

    Passport Office will clarify, but my understanding from a similar status and working with Home Office and Immigration is

    You do not have dual citizenship in the UK. If another country allows you to have dual nationality, like France, then you can do what you like there, but in the UK you are either British or not British.

    Passports are required to prove right to enter a country. A UK passport when used to exit the country is mainly for the travel company, although in other countries there are other reasons and restrictions.

    When you enter a foreign country with a UK passport you have a right to the services of the consulate in case of mishap. If you enter the foreign country with a non-UK passport you are on your own, you may also need different visas.

    Different countries have different views on nationality and citizenship. Some countries allow you to choose which nationality to use, and others claim you as a citizen if your grandparents were nationals, which can see you conscripted into the local army, or force other restrictions, or benefits on you. However, in the UK with UK citizenship you are a UK citizen. I say UK because people from some of the Commonwealth and former colonies have British passports but not UK passports and there are restrictions and no right to reside.


    If your child is entitled to a UK passport, that is all they need to go to and from France with a school party. They will need their own passport, and for a trip to France they will need a UK passport to avoid the need for visas and disruption, by needing to join the non-EU queue when coming back, which they would need with a US passport.

    Your confusion may have arisen because the Immigration people are generally on the look out for children travelling with a parent with a different nationality as they may have been kidnapped by feuding parents.

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    • #3
      Re: Dual citizenship - USA / UK

      Just a quick note to add I would also double check with the school, Patchouli, as my daughter's school always include the children on a group passport to avoid the need to obtain individual ones.
      If happy little bluebirds fly, beyond the rainbow, why, oh why can't I?

      sigpic

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      • #4
        Re: Dual citizenship - USA / UK

        I am British, hubby is American, boys born in the UK, we live in the UK.

        I asked someone else and they said pretty much what you said... if he travels to any country all he needs is a UK passport but if he goes to America he MUST have an American passport in order to leave as they are considered American when there... What a crock of bull.. they aren't cheap!!

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        • #5
          Re: Dual citizenship - USA / UK

          As your Son was born in the UK and you are British he can travel anywhere his UK passport is recognised and has Julian stated, can re-enter the UK at will

          If he goes to the US and enters using his UK passport and his visit is just for a holiday then he will enter under the ESTA treaty that exists between UK & US, you register for the ESTA on line for a few ££, he will be given a maximum allowed stay of 90 days and then will need to leave. If he wants to go to the US for any other reason than a holiday (studying for example, or extended stay with relatives) you will have to go to the US Embassy and jump through some hoops to get the correct type of entry Visa, I had to do that myself for the right Visa I needed, it can be a bit intimidating, due to the enhanced security these days, but not the worst of experiences if you get a decent minded inspector.

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          • #6
            Re: Dual citizenship - USA / UK

            I agree, had to visit US Embassy a few years ago, very daunting when entering, but once inside everyone is very nice.
            I'm an official AAD Moderator and also a volunteer, here to help make the forum run smoothly. Any views or opinions are mine and not the official line of AAD. Similarly, any advice I have offered you is done so on an informal basis, without prejudice or liability. If in doubt seek advice from a qualified insured professional - Find a Solicitor or go to the National Probono Centre.

            If you spot an abusive or libellous post then please report it by Clicking Here. If you need to contact me, for instance if I've issued you a warning, moved, edited or deleted your post, please send me a message by clicking my username.

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            • #7
              Re: Dual citizenship - USA / UK

              Travelling in Europe, I would use the UK passport as it it easier to obtain. It is valid worldwide and you don't need a visa for France.

              If you want protection of the US and the UK whilst travelling abroad you need both passports. However, you can only claim the protection of the nation if you entered the country with the passport of that nation. You enter a country with a single passport, so you take your pick if you have more than one. As the UK and the US both have international status, then the UK passport is as good as the US passport except in the US.

              If you book an airline flight of packaged holiday you need to supply the passport details for the receiving countries security clearance before you board the plane, so you cannot swap nationalities mid-flight or there may be confusion when you land.

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              • #8
                Re: Dual citizenship - USA / UK

                Hi Canadian mum UK dad UK Son, he has UK passport I registered his birth in canada and yes if he does't have an american passport he needs to oblige by the laws of a UK citizen ie will need to get the visa for entering and can only stay for so long.

                Getting him an American passport would mean he wouldn't have to get the 2yearly visa and could stay in the country for longer than 90- days . We will be getting my son a Canadian passport just so haven't gotten around to it.

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                • #9
                  Re: Dual citizenship - USA / UK

                  Well if we had the money I would as his one from birth has expired now... the USA birth certificate is SO pretty compared to the UK one though... is the Canadian one as colourful and ornate?

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                  • #10
                    Re: Dual citizenship - USA / UK

                    it has a map of the province you were born to on it.

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                    • #11
                      Re: Dual citizenship - USA / UK

                      Originally posted by patchouli View Post
                      Do my boys HAVE to have both US and UK passports. (Mother UK - Father US with perm' leave to stay)

                      We were told back when I arranged their PP that they HAD to have both, they could leave the UK on a UK PP but to return they would need both.

                      Now this peed me off as it isn't cheap and it isn't a joy to get the US PP either... it was a horridy Londony trip!!!! Now one of our children (12) has the opportunity to go to France next year but I don't have any PP valid.... do I need to do both again?
                      I would give my eye teeth for two passports. Have you even considered the positives of this? Some countries allow in certain nationals and other countries reject them. The Middle East springs to mind. As a journalist I missed out on assignments because I didn't have the *right* passport to guarantee entry to a country. It isn't always about visas.

                      Eventually your boys will grow up (perish the thought) and thank you for the two passport option.

                      Nothing horridy about a trip to London. I love living here

                      I don't give advice, I share wisdom. Whenever the chips are down there's always a Plan B

                      I'm a fully qualified mother which is the hardest exam I've ever sat. I have other more formal qualifications which are less important

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                      • #12
                        Re: Dual citizenship - USA / UK

                        I'd give my 'eye teeth' for the money to afford it! lol I have 5 children, 2 grandchildren, a disabled Mother who insists on doing everything herself, debts springing out every orifice, two businesses to run and a nervous breakdown to keep at bay. ha ha ha!!
                        They did have both when they were born as we were told (wrongly) that they HAD to have both and they will always have that option... the trip to London was horrendous, I LOATH cities and the people at the Embassy were a nasty lot (might have been a bad day for ALL of them or something).

                        I'm happy with them not having an American passport until we HAVE to have one.. besides.. After looking into his school trip on parent pay it was Italy not France and though it seems we may well afford the passport if we save but the bloody holiday is £900!!!!!! Add equipment and other sundires to that and it would be a GRAND for a 13 year old to go away for a week.. SHEESH!

                        Italy - February 2015 - Ski Trip, To Pay: £915.00
                        So no passport will be bought... lmao

                        Eventually your boys will grow up (perish the thought)
                        I hope they do grow up... I couldn't live if anything happened to any of my children :-(

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Re: Dual citizenship - USA / UK

                          If it were me, and i could have 2 passports, and were planning a trip to USA. I would have to consider whether it was easier to travel with a US passport, or a UK one.

                          It's been quite some time since i travelled to USA, but if passport control is anything like the UK ones, then you would have a USA passport queue, and an "any other" which is generally rhe rest of the world. Then it could potentially be quicker to enter the country.

                          Im not savvy on the level of protection from each embassy so wouldnt know if thats a factor.
                          I'm an official AAD Moderator and also a volunteer, here to help make the forum run smoothly. Any views or opinions are mine and not the official line of AAD. Similarly, any advice I have offered you is done so on an informal basis, without prejudice or liability. If in doubt seek advice from a qualified insured professional - Find a Solicitor or go to the National Probono Centre.

                          If you spot an abusive or libellous post then please report it by Clicking Here. If you need to contact me, for instance if I've issued you a warning, moved, edited or deleted your post, please send me a message by clicking my username.

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                          • #14
                            Re: Dual citizenship - USA / UK

                            Originally posted by SXGuy View Post
                            If it were me, and i could have 2 passports, and were planning a trip to USA. I would have to consider whether it was easier to travel with a US passport, or a UK one.

                            It's been quite some time since i travelled to USA, but if passport control is anything like the UK ones, then you would have a USA passport queue, and an "any other" which is generally rhe rest of the world. Then it could potentially be quicker to enter the country.

                            Im not savvy on the level of protection from each embassy so wouldnt know if thats a factor.
                            Thats correct, as you enter the immigration hall there are two ways to queue, US citizens and residents, or non citizen non resident visitors. Depending on the flight origin either one can be processed quickly, usually if on a British flight to say Florida a holiday destination there are usually very few US citizens on board, so there can be quite a wait in the non citizens queue and hardly anyone in the US citizens entry point. In bound on a schedule flight to say New York or similar, then there is a mixture of nationalities so immigration moves pretty quickly whichever queue you need to go in.


                            The TSA inspectors who process you through immigration passport control are a law unto themselves, I think they are chosen because they are too tough for the CIA .....I have TSA security clearance for entering the US due to the activity I do when there, but even so I just answer their questions yes sir no sir three bags full sir....bend over sir ?...of course sir !

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                            • #15
                              Re: Dual citizenship - USA / UK

                              Havent been since the TSA took over, and from what ive read about them, i dont plan to either.
                              I'm an official AAD Moderator and also a volunteer, here to help make the forum run smoothly. Any views or opinions are mine and not the official line of AAD. Similarly, any advice I have offered you is done so on an informal basis, without prejudice or liability. If in doubt seek advice from a qualified insured professional - Find a Solicitor or go to the National Probono Centre.

                              If you spot an abusive or libellous post then please report it by Clicking Here. If you need to contact me, for instance if I've issued you a warning, moved, edited or deleted your post, please send me a message by clicking my username.

                              Comment

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